Abbott Wins Approval of Daily Feline Pain Drug

Simbadol may be administered once a day for pain control after feline surgery.


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The most frequent adverse reactions with Simbadol are hypotension, tachycardia, hypothermia, hyperthermia, hypertension, anorexia and hyperactivity.

Simbadol, a pain-control drug designed to minimize the need for overnight dosing after feline surgery, has received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Abbott Animal Health reported today.

The medication is the first and only FDA-approved opioid analgesic for cats to provide 24-hour pain control in a single dose, the Abbott Park, Ill., drug maker noted.

Simbadol (buprenorphine injection) is indicated for the control of postoperative pain associated with surgical procedures in cats.

The drug has the backing of pain specialist Robin Downing, DVM, CVPP, CCRP, Dipl. AAPM, the hospital director at Windsor Veterinary Clinic and The Downing Center for Animal Pain Management in Windsor, Colo.

“For the first time veterinarians have a once-daily opioid to provide 24-hour surgical pain control for their feline patients, even through the night,” Dr. Downing said.

A randomized blinded clinical program involving more than 200 cats found Simbadol to be safe and effective, she said.

Simbadol’s approval was the second this year for an Abbott veterinary drug. The FDA in February approved Paccal Vet-CA1 (paclitaxel for injection), which is indicted for the treatment of canine mammary carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma.

Abbott obtained the worldwide distribution rights to Paccal Vet-CA1―the first veterinary drug to utilize paclitaxel―from Sweden-based Oasmia Pharmaceutical AB.

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