Colorado State Launches Canine Massage Course



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The Colorado State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences has launched a new continuing education course in canine massage.

Medical Massage for Animals, designed for veterinarians, veterinary technicians, massage therapists and canine rehabilitators, emphasizes the scientific basis of massage and its foundational elements of anatomy and physiology.

“Massage can help canine patients and athletes recover from illness, injury, spinal pain and stress,” said Narda Robinson, DVM, DO, a professor in the Department of Clinical Sciences and director of Colorado State’s Center for Comparative and Integrative Pain Medicine, who will co-teach the course. “Participants will have a unique opportunity to learn the proper integration of massage in the veterinary clinic for either sick or well patients, and will gain those skills based on solid, scientific information.”

The hands-on program will cover musculoskeletal anatomy, muscle physiology, canine first aid, canine behavior and issues related to the human animal bond and working with grieving clients.

The course begins Oct. 17 and is available on a first-come, first-served basis. It will include written examinations, a practical examination and 20 hours of closely reviewed independent study. Eighty hours of continuing education are also available.

Additional instructors include:

• Judy Walton, CVT, VTS (Oncology), developer of a canine massage course at the Boulder College of Massage Therapy;
• Rhonda Reich, a 30-year massage therapist and instructor with an additional 10 years of experience dedicated to animal massage;
• Bonnie Wright, DVM, a pain medicine practitioner at the Center for Comparative and Integrative Pain Medicine;
• Chris Way, a rolfer and massage therapist;
• Erin Allen, a clinical counselor at the Argus Institute at Colorado State; and
• Tim Hackett, DVM, head of the small animal critical care unit at the university’s James L. Voss Animal Teaching Hospital.

Click here for details.

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