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Hartz Withdraws Chicken Chews, Oinkies Pig Skin Twists With Chicken



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Trace amounts of antibiotic residue do not pose a health or pet safety risk, Hartz Mountain Corp. reported.

“Even though two-thirds of the products we tested did not contain antibiotic residues, we would rather be overly cautious by voluntarily withdrawing these products from the market,” Secaucus, N.J.-based Hartz Mountain Corp. stated.

Antibiotic residue led two other manufacturers to take similar steps in recent weeks. St. Louis-based Nestle Purina PetCare Co. voluntarily withdrew all Waggin’ Train and Canyon Creek Ranch chicken jerky dog treats sold in the United States, while Milo’s Kitchen, a brand of San Francisco-based Del Monte Corp., voluntarily recalled Chicken Jerky and Chicken Grillers Home-style treats.

The antibiotics discovered in the Hartz treats are approved for use in poultry in China and European Union nations but not in the United States, Hartz noted. No evidence has been found that the treats raise health concerns or sicken pets, the company added.

“Upon learning about the nationwide voluntary withdrawal of several other brands of chicken jerky products through media reports, Hartz acted immediately to begin additional testing to determine if the same unapproved antibiotic residues were present in our products,” said Sean McNear, senior director of quality and regulatory at Hartz Mountain.

No other Hartz products are affected by the company’s action.

Consumers may contact Hartz at 800-275-1414 to request a refund.

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