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Obese Pet Label Given To New Parents And Elderly Owners



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Flexcin International announces data findings stating new parents represent the fastest-growing demographic inquiring about dog-joint health issues relating to pet obesity.

The company analyzed demographic data from its customer advisor department to determine the largest percentage of pet obesity-related inquiries. In a six-month analysis from June through December 2010, new parents represented roughly 32 percent of all dog-joint health inquiries tied to overweight pets, which is an increase from 25.7 percent in 2008. Elderly pet owners came in second at 28.5 percent.

Other data gleaned from new parent pet owners showed that 78 percent say their dog eats food that dropped from the baby’s high-chair, 68 percent say they pay less attention to their dog’s food portions and 65 percent say they had less time for dog walks.

“Through the research and our discussions with veterinarian experts, new parents tend to let down their guard when watching their dogs’ diet because their focus is clearly on addressing their new baby,” says Tamer Elsafy, CEO and founder of Flexcin.

The Association for Pet Obesity Prevention recently reported that one out of five of the 170 million dogs and cats in the U.S. are considered obese. Flexcin reminds veterinarians and owners that pets gaining even a few pounds can add significant stress to their body’s frame, which can ultimately lead to joint pain and arthritis.

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