Veterinary Groups Urge USDA To Ban Horse Soring Implements

Posted: June 14, 2012, 3:40 p.m. EDT



Published:

Veterinary Groups Urge USDA to Ban Horse Soring Implements equine practitioners, horse soring, horse foot pain, horse vet, equine vet, veterinary The American Association of Equine Practitioners and American Veterinary Medical Association urged the U.S. Department of Agriculture to prohibit the use of action devices and performance packages in the training and showing of Tennessee Walking Horses.The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services is considering changes to the regulations that could prohibit or restrict the devices, but there are no formal plans at present.newsline Veterinary Groups Urge USDA to Ban Horse Soring Implements

The American Association of Equine Practitioners and American Veterinary Medical Association urged the U.S. Department of Agriculture to prohibit the use of action devices and performance packages in the training and showing of Tennessee Walking Horses.

 

Action devices, such as chains, ankle rings, collars, rollers and wood or aluminum bead bracelets, are used in conjunction with chemical irritants on the pastern of a horse’s foot to cause pain and induce an exaggerated gait, according to a joint statement issued by the American Association of Equine Practitioners and American Veterinary Medical Association. There is little scientific evidence indicating that the use of action devices on their own are detrimental to the health and welfare of the horse, but banning the devices would reduce the motivation to apply a chemical irritant, the organizations reported.

The U.S. Equestrian Federation, the national governing body for equestrian sport in the United States, does not allow action devices in the show ring for all recognized breed affiliates.

Performance packages, also called stacks or pads, made of plastic, leather, wood and rubber, are attached below the sole of the horse’s natural hoof and have a metal band that runs around the hoof wall to maintain them in place. The packages add weight to the horse’s foot, causing it to strike the ground with more force and at an abnormal angle, the AVMA and AAEP said. The packages can also facilitate the concealment of items that apply pressure to the sole of the horse’s hoof, and pressure from those hidden items produces pain in the hoof so that the horse lifts its feet faster and higher in an exaggerated gait.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services is considering changes to the regulations that could prohibit or restrict the devices, but there are no formal plans at present, according to APHIS spokesperson David Sacks. Under current regulations, a foreign substance causing pain to a horse qualifies as a soring violation. Due to a recent APHIS rule change, anyone responsible for soring a horse is subject to minimum penalties under the Horse Protection Act.

<HOME>

Archive »Read More

California Pet Insurance Consumer Protection Bill Signed by Brown

Under Assembly Bill 2056, pet insurers will be required to disclose policy information such as reimbursement benefits and pre-existing condition limitations.

Michigan Practitioner Chosen as AVMF Vet of Year

Dr. Tim Hunt of Bayshore Veterinary Hospital is named the 2014 America’s Favorite Veterinarian.

Animal Behaviorist Sophia Yin Dies at 48

A writer, speaker, peer educator and consultant, Dr. Sophia Yin believed in positive reinforcement for the training of animals.

Add your comment:

Events


Show More...