Trupanion Adds Coverage For Breeding Pets



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Trupanion Adds Coverage for Breeding PetsTrupanion, pets, breeding, cats, dogsPet insurance provider Trupanion expanded its coverage to include breeding pets, the Seattle-based company reported today.Pet insurance provider Trupanion expanded its coverage to include breeding pets.newslineTrupanion Adds Coverage for Breeding PetsPosted: March 27, 2012, 3:25 p.m. EST

breeding dog
Pet insurance provider Trupanion expanded its coverage to include breeding pets, the Seattle-based company reported today.

Breeding dogs and cats had previously been ineligible for coverage due to the increased risks associated with the breeding process, the company said. Pets that are not spayed or neutered more commonly develop conditions, such as mammary gland tumors and ovarian cancer in females and testicular cancer and prostate disease in males, according to Trupanion. Females can also develop medical complications related to pregnancy.

“It is important for us to be able to offer a coverage plan that benefits all dogs and cats, so we worked hard to develop a way to incorporate breeding pets,” said Darryl Rawlings, CEO at Trupanion. “Now we can help ensure these pet owners are able to provide the best care to their pets in the unfortunate event a health issue arises.”

To receive coverage for breeding-related conditions, pet owners must classify their dog or cat as a breeding pet when enrolling with Trupanion.

Late last year, Trupanion added benefits for therapeutic food.

<HOME>http://www.veterinarypracticenews.com/images/vpn-tab-image/dog-with-puppies-300px.jpg3/27/2012 12:24 PM

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