CSU's Edward Hoover Joins National Academy Of Sciences

A Colorado State University professor was elected to the National Academy of Sciences.


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A Colorado State University professor who developed the most widely used vaccine against feline leukemia was among 84 people elected Tuesday to the National Academy of Sciences.

Edward A. Hoover, DVM, MS, Ph.D., Dipl. ACVP, became the third faculty member in the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences to receive the prestigious honor. The others are his nominating sponsor, Barry Beaty, MS, Ph.D., a professor of microbiology, immunology and pathology, and George Seidel Jr., MS, Ph.D., a professor of biomedical sciences.

Dr. Hoover, an eminent faculty member in the department of microbiology, immunology and pathology, developed the FeLV vaccine, which protects cats from leukemia-causing retrovirus, Colorado State reported. In addition to studying disease prevention, he has investigated transmission pathways and ways to identify at-risk cats.

 Edward Hoover
Dr. Edward A. Hoover is a diplomate in the American College of Veterinary Pathologists (anatomic pathology).

"It's a true distinction to have a research scientist of Dr. Hoover's caliber on our campus and in our college," said the college's dean, Mark Stetter, DVM, Dipl. ACZM. "His work with the feline leukemia vaccine is improving the health of pets around the world, and this same research has helped in the development of important human vaccines."

The honor was humbling, Hoover said.

"My first thought was, 'I'm sure there's a mistake, but I'm afraid to let them know,'" he added.

Hoover also has researched chronic wasting disease in deer and elk. In 2006, Hoover and colleagues were the first to explain how chronic wasting disease is transmitted through the shedding of prions in blood, urine and saliva, according to Colorado State.

"His pioneering work on the feline leukemia virus and chronic wasting disease has transformed our understanding of how disease spreads among populations, and how we can slow that spread in the interest of public and animal health," said university President Tony Frank, DVM, Ph.D.

Hoover oversees the university's combined DVM/Ph.D. program. He received the Merial-Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges Excellence in Research Award in 2012.

The National Academy of Sciences, a nonprofit association of expert advisers, is based in Washington, D.C. It is made up of 2,214 active members and 444 foreign associates.

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