Texas A&M To Unveil Veterinary Emergency Team



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The Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences will unveil its Veterinary Emergency Team on Wednesday, Dec. 1.

The Veterinary Emergency Team is a high-tech mobile unit capable of going into disaster areas and operating independently for up to two weeks to help care for pets and livestock, according to the college.

Veterinary Practice News reported on the team’s formation in late June, when it was still finalizing the acquisition of necessary supplies. The team is now prepared to “swing into action,” Texas A&M reported today.

The vehicles and on-board equipment are outfitted to provide triage care and to perform minor surgeries. The team also assesses disaster situations and evaluates all animals on site.

“We want to limit animal suffering,” said Wesley Bissett, DVM, Ph.D., assistant professor and coordinator of the Texas A&M University Veterinary Emergency Team. “So animal welfare will be paramount to our thinking. Our college was founded on service to the state, so being able to respond when animals in the state are in need is in our tradition of service.”

The team is supported by the Texas Animal Health Commission; Texas Task Force-1, the search-and-rescue unit operated by the Texas Engineering Extension Service; the American Association Equine Practitioners; the Texas Small Animal Rescue; and emergency personnel across the state of Texas.

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