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Survey: Ross University Grads Happy to Be Veterinarians

RUSVM conducted an alumni survey to understand the employment status one year post graduation.


An aerial view of Ross University in the St. Kitts, West Indies.

Ross University

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Ninety percent of Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine (RUSVM) graduates are satisfied with their career choice to become veterinarians, according to the school’s recently released 2013 Alumni Survey Report.

RUSVM conducts the alumni survey annually to understand the employment status one year post graduation, as well as gain a sense of preparation levels by its graduates. The 2013 survey was sent to 274 graduates. A total of 87 graduates (32 percent) responded.

Salary of  Recent RUSVM Graduates

Source: Ross University

Sixty-two percent of all employed Ross University graduates had salaries of more than $60,000 a year. 

Graduates didn’t seem to have a hard time finding a job as 86 percent found one within six months after graduation. Five percent found a job between six and 10 months of graduation. The remaining graduates either did not report (8 percent) or were unemployed (1 percent).

In regard to salary, 62 percent of respondents indicated they made more than $60,000, 21 percent reported a salary of $40,000 to $59,000 and 15 percent earned less than $40,000. The majority (10 out of 13) of the graduates earning less than $40,000 are pursuing an internship or residency program, according to the survey.

Overall, the breakdown of current professional activity: private small animal practice (55 percent); corporate small animal practice (9 percent); private mixed animal practice, primarily small animal (10 percent); private mixed animal practice, primarily large animal (3.5 percent); private practice equine exclusive (3.5 percent); internship, residency, graduate school (13 percent); and other (6 percent).

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