Hallmarq Equine MRI Scans At 40,000 And Counting



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Hallmarq’s Standing Equine MRI is designed to scan a horse’s foot and lower limb in a standing position without the need for general anesthesia.

Hallmarq Veterinary Imaging has reached a milestone with the 40,000th scan using its Standing Equine MRI machine.

The British company, which has U.S. offices in Acton, Mass., reported that the 40,000th scan was done on a French saddle horse, R., as part of a re-examination at Clinique Equine de Livet in Saint-Michel-de-Livet, France. Following the treatment of injuries to its front feet, the 8-year-old show jumper was scanned to ensure the horse was ready to return to competition.

Hallmarq called the 40,000th scan a "pinnacle achievement” that also confirmed R.’s successful rehabilitation.

"Hallmarq’s Standing Equine MRI machine really offers veterinarians an easy, reliable and clear diagnostic tool that provides the veterinarian with much-needed information and does not put a horse at risk by requiring general anesthesia,” said Dan Brown, BVSc, MRCVS, business development director at Hallmarq. "Our system is safer for the horse and easier for the veterinarian.”

Standing Equine MRI is designed to diagnose lameness problems in sedated horses. The scans may be conducted with or without anesthesia, and the diagnostic rate is comparable to those of high-field MRI scans done under anesthesia, the company stated.

The machines are made in Guildford, England. Twenty-one have been installed in North America, most recently in Texas and British Columbia, since 2004, Hallmarq added.

The company also manufactures PetVet, a 1.5 Tesla high-field MRI designed for companion animals.

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