Hackett Named Director Of CSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital



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The new leadership of James L. Voss Veterinary Teaching Hospital includes director Tim Hackett and administrator Gail Gumminger.

Colorado State University has removed the "interim” tag from the leader of the James L. Voss Veterinary Teaching Hospital.

Tim Hackett, DVM, MS, Dipl. ACVECC, who served as the acting director for 15 months, was named to the permanent post Friday, the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences reported.

Dr. Hackett will officially take over Jan. 15, said the college’s dean, Mark Stetter, DVM, Dipl. ACZM.

"The CSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital is a point of pride for our college, our university and our state,” Dr. Stetter said. "Dr. Hackett and his team will continue building on this foundation as we look ahead to new challenges and opportunities in veterinary medicine.”

Hackett will formally replace Dean Hendrickson, DVM, MS, Dipl. ACVS, who became the college’s associate dean for professional veterinary medicine.

Hackett spent 12 years as section chief for the hospital’s critical care unit and urgent care service. He also is a professor of emergency and critical care medicine.

As hospital director, Hackett is responsible for daily operations and long-term planning. Voss Veterinary Teaching Hospital operates on a $12 million annual budget, employs 600 students, faculty and staff members, and is expected to see more than 40,000 client visits this fiscal year.

Working alongside Hackett will be hospital administrator Gail Gumminger, who served in the role for four years before leaving to become associate director of the university’s human resources department.

Hackett earned his doctoral degree from Colorado State in 1989 and went on to work at several California veterinary clinics. He has published and lectured on critical illness and injury in animals and is past president of the American College of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care.

Last fall he oversaw the grand opening of the E. Myrl Halstead Jensen Center for Emergency Medicine and Critical Care.

Cuts in state funding mean the teaching hospital must strive to become self-sufficient, Hackett said. Among his ideas are to work more closely with Colorado’s beef, dairy and equine industries.

"I look forward to working with our great hospital team to improve clinical operations, to fulfill unmet veterinary needs, to train the next generation of veterinarians and to continue our role as the go-to place for veterinary medicine in the region,” Hackett said.

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