Human Resources: Why Should I Care?

If you are NOT a member of your practice's management or leadership, you may be asking yourself this question: "Human resources? Why should I care?"



Although veterinarians treat pets, humans are a business's great asset.

Yuri Arcurs/Hemera/ThinkStock

If you are NOT a member of your practice's management or leadership, you may be asking yourself this question: "Human resources? Why should I care?"

As it turns out, the human resources protocols and policies should matter very much to you, and every other person on the team no matter the position. Here is a sample of why:

  • Would you like to know what is expected of you when you interview and consider being hired by an organization? Then you'll want to see a job description.
  • Would you like to be trained on what is expected of you, so that you have every chance to succeed on those specific tasks? Then you'll want to see the training program, which uses the job description as the backbone of essential training.
  • Would you like to be evaluated on those things that are expected of you, that you were trained to do correctly? Then you'll want to see the performance evaluation process, and one that evaluates those tasks on your job description, in your training program.
  • Would you like to know when you do something RIGHT, or are you comfortable with the unwritten policy of "no news is good news?" You may want to find out how positive reinforcement or reward is handled in the practice.
  • Would you like to know when you do something wrong, so that you can correct the issue as soon as possible? Then you'll want to know how continuous coaching or feedback is handled so that you are corrected in a timely manner.
  • Would you like to know when you're about to step over the line, and get yourself fired from your position? Then you'll want to know about progressive discipline, and how clear the warnings will be in the future. You'll want to hear, "the next time, you'll be fired," before you get fired!

These are just some of the reasons human resources should matter to you, no matter what position you fill on the team. Human resources encompasses a whole lot more, such as safety, risk management, employee development, the interview and hiring process, and policies and protocols, just to name a few. Every one of these human resources functions effect you either directly or indirectly.

Sometimes when a practice grows, and there becomes more of an effort to create human resource tools and such, the team may fear the loss of that "family feel" and be wary of the practice becoming, well, "corporate." But have no fear; the stronger the human resources foundation, the better the practice will be for you and everyone else. After all, we treat patients, but HUMANS are our greatest asset in practice.

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