Rosy Gives Me A Lesson In Trust




Rosy Gives Me a Lesson in TrustRosy Gives Me a Lesson in Trust, Katherin Dobbs, Staff Safari, red cat, Dobbs Rosy, red SomaliHer name is really Foxycats Scarlet Rose, but for 14 years we’ve called her Rosy for short. She is a red Somali, purchased from a breeder in Oklahoma.As hard as it is for me to imagine, I’ve never actually owned a pet through its lifetime, from kitten to geriatric, to the end of their life. As I began to notice Rosy aging a few months ago, it occurred to me that I looked forward to caring for her to the end.staff-safariDecember 22, 2011By Katherine Dobbs, RVT, CVPM, PHR

Her name is really Foxycats Scarlet Rose, but for 14 years we’ve called her Rosy for short. She is a red Somali, purchased from a breeder in Oklahoma. We were living in Texas at the time, and made the road trip up across the state line to pick up the little red ball of fur we saw in photos on the Internet. As cute as bug, this little kitten, and she has been the most affectionate, loving, human-obsessed kitty that I’ve ever had the pleasure of owning (her unwavering affection only becomes bothersome if you’re trying to work).

As hard as it is for me to imagine, I’ve never actually owned a pet through its lifetime, from kitten to geriatric, to the end of their life. As I began to notice Rosy aging a few months ago, it occurred to me that I looked forward to caring for her to the end. I just didn’t know the end was going to come so soon.

Dobbs & Rosy
Blogger Katherine Dobbs with her red Somali, Rosy.
Last week I took Rosy to the vet because she had lost weight and her face was looking, well, old. She’s always maintained a slim 8-pound figure (helped in part because she frequently binges and regurgitates her food…the only bulimic cat I’ve ever known), but she was now 6 pounds and 13 ounces on the vet’s scale. I wanted bloodwork, they wanted to add a urinalysis, and off she went for tests.

Now, I had planned to be one of those high-maintenance clients and insist they draw the samples in the exam room with me. Rosy is a little tiger at the vet and like we’ve all heard before from clients, “she’ll do better if she stays with me in the room.” In fact, I planned to stick to my guns and fuss if needed, to do this the way I wanted. I even figured maybe they’d let me hold, being a tech and all. The technician came in and was unaffected as Rosy would let her pet her in one second, and turn around and hiss at her the next.

The doctor was calm, cool and collected, and the tech did this “scruff massage” as the doctor palpated her, which was impressive. Rosy kept up a steady growl. By the time the tests were decided upon, I felt comfortable enough with the technician and doctor that I let Rosy be taken to the back…I got a quick lesson on what I’ve preached before. Establishing trust is the number one factor in being able to convince clients of what you say is needed. In that short window of time, I felt I could trust them with Rosy and I let her go willingly.

I will admit that she came back with a new cone muzzle that I had never seen before, which allows cats to see and breathe better, and they said “she was good.” Hmmm, I know what that means. Anyway, Rosy was none the worse for wear, and we settled in to wait for in-house lab results. I knew in my heart what the likely diagnosis was going to be; I had seen it hundreds of times in my 20+ years in veterinary medicine.

Sure enough, the BUN and Creat were high, and her urine was dilute…chronic renal failure. I listened as the veterinarian explained the diagnosis to my partner who was with me, as I had heard it all before, said it all before to other cat owners. I knew the drill and I knew that eventually, we would be euthanizing Rosy. Just hard to say when. Stick with me as I share Rosy’s journey…it’s tough to be on the other side of the exam table.

http://www.veterinarypracticenews.com/images/vet-editorial-blog/Dobbs-with-Rosy-250px.jpgRosy Gives Me a Lesson in Trust12/22/2011 12:08 PM