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Vet Schools

Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine

MapCollege Station,, TX

Description:

After nearly 100 years of providing students with veterinary training and training 7 percent of all veterinarians nationwide, helping the “livestock, agriculture and cattle” industries through animal-science service, Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences is no stranger to establishing relationships. No wonder it holds one of the Top 10 spots for the nation’s veterinary colleges, according to U. S. News and World Report.


Whether its increasing its teaching and research facilities on its campus or reaching out to local animal welfare groups, Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences is a leader in the mission to help all types of animals and their human counterparts.


“One great example of capturing a new opportunity was the development of a strong partnership with the Houston SPCA which resulted in a required rotation for all senior veterinary students, beginning with the Class of 2014,” said Kenita S. Rogers, DVM, MS, Associate Dean for Professional Programs. “This partnership, which is the largest of its kind in the nation, allows students to be a part of an extraordinary sheltering and animal welfare organization that takes in over 26,000 animals per year.”


One required part of veterinary education at Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences is participation in a clinical rotation teaching veterinary students principles and techniques on emergency response and preparedness. Depending on the community’s needs, fourth year students who work hand-in-hand with five faculty and two staff members may even gain experience in real-world disaster response deployments.


“A two-week rotation was developed that specifically addresses important skills such as leadership, team building, media communication, and planning for disasters at the local county, and state levels,” explained Rogers. “Students on this rotation perform exercises with search-and-rescue units and can be involved if the college Veterinary Emergency Team is deployed in a disaster or emergency response effort.”


Providing veterinary students with a holistic learning approach, since its founding in 2010, the Center for Educational Technologies is integral to help provide informative, helpful and learning channels.


“The most active example of this is our Center for Educational Technology which is under the direction of Dr. Jodi Korich,” Rogers highlighted. “She has assembled a creative team that includes instructional designers, programmers, visual designers and business support to provide expertise and ground level help to college faculty and outside units that wish to provide high-quality, media-rich, learner-focused teaching materials for the DVM curriculum, continuing education, and focused training events.”


Examples of educational materials from the center include Internet-based, self-paced study courses providing students with real-world knowledge on surgical tools including scalpels and examples of diagnostic protocols to diagnosis diseases in a practical setting.


Rogers provides the comprehensive approach for the veterinary program: “We want to provide them with a spectrum of experiences that ground them as professionals and allow them to understand their role in service to others.”


At a Glance

Location: College Station, Texas

Programs: B.A. (Biomedical Sciences), M.S., Ph. D., DVM

Accreditation: American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA)

Graduates: 7,100 (DVM)

Fact: More than 95 percent of all enrollees graduate

Website: www.cvm.tamu.edu


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