Osteosarcoma Statistics

Osteosarcoma Statistics

June 2, 2010

Here are some numbers to keep in mind when dealing with osteosarcoma of long bones:

What on earth is limb sparing?

Limb sparing, or “limb spare,” is a highly specialized limb salvage procedure that consists of en bloc excision of the tumor. Depending on the specific location, the missing bone may or may not need to be replaced with some sort of graft.

The most common and practical location for limb sparing is the distal radius. The missing bone can be replaced with a variety of grafts: the distal ulna; the distal radius segment itself after radiation or pasteurization; an allograft from a bone bank; or a metal cylinder.

Because the stability of the carpus is compromised after removal of the distal radius, the joint requires an arthrodesis. Therefore, a long bone plate spans most of the radius, the carpus and one metacarpal bone.

The most difficult part of limb sparing is not the technique, or the cost or postoperative care. It is the selection of the correct candidate: There should be minimal adjacent soft tissue invasion.

Chemotherapy is always used after limb sparing, systemically and sometimes locally.

Survival does not seem to be greatly improved by limb sparing, compared to amputation. This option is therefore chosen when the client will not accept the concept of amputation, or when the amputee would predictably not function well. 

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For example, dogs with severe orthopedic or neurological conditions may not be good candidates for amputation. Careful assessment is critical to ensure that limb sparing is a better option.

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Source URL: https://www.veterinarypracticenews.com/osteosarcoma-statistics/