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Cornell Vet College Names New Dean

Dr. Lorin Warnick is the new dean of Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine.

Dr. Lorin Warnick has been named the new dean of Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine.

Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine

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Cornell University has named Lorin Warnick, DVM, Ph.D., Dipl. ACVPM, as the Austin O. Hooey Dean of Veterinary Medicine. His appointment became effective May 6.

Dr. Warnick has been interim dean for the college since August 2015. Prior to that, Warnick served as associate dean for veterinary education since 2007 and director of the Cornell University Hospital for Animals since 2012.

“Lorin is the ideal choice to lead the College of Veterinary Medicine as dean,” said Cornell Provost Michael Kotlikoff, VMD, Ph.D. “He is a proven leader who has managed the college effectively and with great thoughtfulness since taking over as interim dean last year. He will keep the college on the cutting edge of best practices in veterinary medicine and scientific research.”

Though Warnick has been a faculty member in the college since 1996, he said, “Being interim dean has given me new insights into how the college operates and an in-depth understanding of the main issues we are facing.”

As dean, Warnick said his overall vision is “to excel in our core missions of research, veterinary education, graduate education and service to the public.”

Specifically, on the research side, Warnick aims to make high-level faculty recruitments, especially in areas of biomedical research, where the college plans to promote collaborations across campus and with Weill Cornell Medicine.

In the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program, Warnick said he will continue to work on educational initiatives to improve preparation for the primary care small-animal practice. This will include completion of a new facility to house the college’s Community Practice Service.

In addition to clinical experience, “We want to better prepare our students to be engaged in business entrepreneurship and new technology, and really play a leadership role in the business side of veterinary medicine,” he said.

With the number of U.S. veterinary schools expanding, Warnick sees “recruiting the best DVM students,” with a focus on diversifying each class, as an immediate challenge. He said his administration will continue looking for ways to reduce student debt levels and provide a greater variety of career opportunities. Veterinary medicine affects human and animal health, covering food production and safety, public health, racing and performance horses, biomedical research, wildlife conservation and international development as well as companion animal care.

“We would like to have our students prepared and to have options to participate in all of those different areas,” he said.

Warnick is also a professor of ambulatory and production medicine. One of his main research areas includes the emergence of drug-resistant bacteria and how much these microbes are shared between different host populations. Warnick said with the help of his lab team he plans to continue with research while serving as dean.

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