Fund matching campaign launched for National Dog Day

Morris Animal Foundation will receive matching funds up to $75,000 for all donations received up to Aug. 31

Canine research studies exploring bloat, urinary tract infections, and extracorporeal shockwave therapy are set to get a boost in funding, thanks to a newly launched donation matching campaign. Photo ©BigStockPhoto.comCanine research studies exploring bloat, urinary tract infections, and extracorporeal shockwave therapy are set to get a boost in funding, thanks to a newly launched donation matching drive.

On Aug. 1, Morris Animal Foundation kicked off its fifth annual month-long National Dog Day campaign, aimed at raising funds for canine health research to help dogs enjoy longer, healthier lives.

Now through Aug. 31, long-time donors from Eagle River, Alaska, will match all donations up to a total of $75,000 as part of the “Denali Double Dog Dare” matching gift challenge.

“We are so grateful to these donors who realize how important dogs are to so many people and that they deserve the best care we can provide,” says Morris Animal Foundation’s president and CEO, Tiffany Grunert.

Currently, there are several Morris-funded canine health research projects underway at facilities across the U.S. The focuses of these studies include:

  • Advancing the knowledge of gastric dilatation volvulus (i.e. bloat) (Tufts University);
  • Assessing a new therapy to treat dogs with clinical urinary tract infections to help reduce the risk of antibiotic-resistant infections (University of California, Davis);
  • Testing the potential of a new gene editing strategy to correct defects in genes important for heart function in dogs (University of Florida); and
  • Evaluating a noninvasive and affordable therapy for lower back pain in dogs, called extracorporeal shockwave therapy (The Ohio State University).

The foundation also runs the Golden Retriever Lifetime Study, which is among the largest, most comprehensive prospective canine health studies in the U.S. While primarily intended to identify the nutritional, environmental, lifestyle, and genetic risk factors for cancer and other diseases in dogs, extensive data collection is informing other areas of canine health as well. Now in its 10th year, the study follows the lives of more than 3,000 golden retrievers across the country.

Since 1948, Morris Animal Foundation has funded more than 1,000 canine health studies, tackling research related to cancer, heart disease, arthritis, and infectious diseases.

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