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Potash America Forms Animal Supplement Division

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Potash America Forms Animal Supplement Divisionanimal supplement, Potash America, Trace Elements ClayReno, Nev.-based Potash America Inc., a publicly traded exploration stage mining company, has formed a new division, to be called Trace Elements Clay, to focus on the use of its calcium-montmorillonite as an animal supplement.Potash America Inc., a publicly traded exploration stage mining company, has formed a new division, to be called Trace Elements Clay, to focus on the use of its calcium-montmorillonite as an animal supplement.newslinePotash America Forms Animal Supplement DivisionPosted: May 8, 2012, 1:45 p.m. EDT

Reno, Nev.-based Potash America Inc., a publicly traded exploration stage mining company, has formed a new division, to be called Trace Elements Clay, to focus on the use of its calcium-montmorillonite as an animal supplement.

The company also acquired several domain names for the new division, including TraceElementsClay.com, TEC-Canine.com, TEC-Feline.com, TEC-Equine.com, TEC-Bovine.com and TEC-Poultry.com.

Montmorillonite
Large hill of montmorillonite on yellow cap claim.

Specifically, the company plans “to focus on the probiotic nature of the clay as well as the toxin flushing benefit that the negatively ion-charged montmorillonite provides,” the company reported today.

“We have reviewed the historical data available regarding montmorillonite and these benefits to the animal community,” said Barry Wattenberg, Potash’s president and CEO. “Additionally, we note the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has asked farmers to curtail the usage of antibiotics in the food chain. We believe our clay can effectively serve to assist the farming community in meeting these goals while boosting productivity…Calcium-montmorillonite has been previously granted GRAS (generally recognized as safe) status with the FDA and is currently in use in certain animal supplement markets.”

While the clay is also used for cat litter and koi ponds, the company believes its deposit is especially rich in trace elements, including boron and selenium, which makes it particularly suitable for animal supplementation.

The company has purchased 39 claims and staked 48 more in a montmorillonite deposit in Sodaville, Nevada. The company plans to sell clay available to it from previously worked open pit quarries, subject to existing Bureau of Land Management tonnage restrictions and acquiring government approval for commercial production.

The company began exploratory drilling of one quarry last week as the beginning of its project to produce a 3D map of the deposit. The company expects testing of samples would take several weeks but the new division could begin operations “shortly.”

The company has determined the clay in the deposit is “suitable for animal supplement without any blending necessary” and could also be blended into a premium soil amendment. The company expects to market the clay as a consumable product rather than a raw ingredient.

The company currently does not generate revenues.

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