UC Davis Vets Hold Continuing Education Symposium in China

Vets from UC Davis traveled to China to showcase techniques.

Andrew Burton, DVM, shows a group of Chinese veterinarians what he does when performing a routine canine physical exam.

Veterinarians from the University of California, Davis School of Veterinary Medicine leveled the international veterinary playing field somewhat as they traveled to China to showcase the latest small animal veterinary techniques.

The inaugural International Small Animal Practice Symposium—produced and taught by UC Davis’ Andrew Burton, DVM, Gina Davis, DVM, Dipl. ABVP, Jonathan Dear, DVM, Dipl. ACVIM, and Karl Jandrey, DVM, MAS, Dipl. ACVECC—was held over a four-day span at the Nanjing Agricultural University’s College of Veterinary Medicine in Nanjing, China.

The multiple daily sessions were attended by 50 Chinese veterinarians.

The veterinary focus in China is on food animal medicine, according to UC Davis, and educational opportunities for veterinary students interested in small animal medicine are not as plentiful as they are at American and other Western veterinary schools.

Drs. Burton, Davis, Dear and Jandrey discussed topics routinely encountered at the UC Davis’ William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital.

“Our colleagues at Nanjing Agricultural University were fantastic hosts and truly placed a large amount of energy and support into this event,” said Jandrey.

“They are committed to continue this relationship and these training symposia,” he added.

The daily symposium schedule consisted of:
•  A four-hour morning session, consisting of a series of lectures focused on common issues and problems in small animal general practice, such as chronic renal failure, fluid therapy, respiratory distress and dermatologic disease, and delivered by a different UC Davis veterinarian each day.
• All four veterinarians taught alongside each other in four-hour afternoon laboratories.
• Small group, hands-on learning allowed for the application of techniques discussed in the morning lectures.
• Sample laboratory procedures included physical examination, bone marrow aspiration, endotracheal lavage, arthrocentesis and esophagostomy tube placement.

This is the first overseas continuing education event conducted since Jandrey became director of UC Davis’ Center for Continuing Professional Education.

With the success of this event and the need for more continuing education in underserved and developing regions of the world, Jandrey looks forward to producing more of these events.

“As small animal clinical veterinary medicine becomes more refined and embraced in China, UC Davis is ready to assist with more intensive training symposia with both lectures and laboratories that enhance their level of practice,” he concluded.

Another group of veterinarians from UC Davis are planning to travel to Nanjing in the fall with new topics to discuss.

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