Hip Dysplasia: Classic Changes On X-rays

Changes regarding the reading of X-rays of hip displaysia.

When evaluating dysplastic hip films, radiographic changes may include:

A 7-month-old male Labrador suffering from severe hip dysplasia.

• Hip subluxation, i.e. less than 66 percent coverage of the femoral head by the acetabulum.

• The margins of the acetabulum and femoral head are not parallel. They form a triangle or a wedge.

• Increased width of the joint space.

• Thickening of the femoral neck.

• Flattening or deformity of the femoral head.

• Flattening of the acetabulum.

A 6-year-old female Rottweiler suffering from severe hip dysplasia.

• Irregular acetabulum rim.

• Osteophytes on the acetabulum, femoral head and neck.

• Sclerosis of the subchondral bone.

A description of a normal hip would include:

• Two-thirds of the femoral head are covered by the acetabulum.

• The margins of the acetabulum and femoral head are parallel.

• A small, flattened area of the femoral head represents the fovea capitis, which is where the round ligament attaches. This is a normal finding.

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