21901-2

Delete

Print full article

V Foundation announces grant-making program for canine oncology research

Cancer is the leading cause of death in dogs, with one in four developing the disease in their lifetime

Suggested Veterinary Products

The V Foundation has announced a grant-making program to accelerate research in the field of canine comparative oncology, enabling researchers from human and veterinary medicine to explore new cancer therapies.

Over the past three years, the V Foundation has awarded more than $700,000 for canine comparative oncology through a collaboration between NC State College of Veterinary Medicine and Duke Cancer Institute.

“This program will not only provide benefits to the millions of canine and human patients each year who get cancer, it will make the challenging process of identifying new approaches to cancer prevention, diagnosis, and treatment more efficient and effective,” said Michael Kastan, executive director of Duke Cancer Institute.

The V Foundation is working with cancer centers and veterinary colleges nationwide to make grants for canine comparative oncology with a goal of faster and less costly care for dogs and humans, as well as better informed research designs.

Canine tumors often share multiple characteristics with human cancers, including responses to specific therapies, making canine comparative oncology a field with promising outcomes—especially in rare and pediatric cancers.

“Because certain cancers are very common in dogs, and because a dog’s life is much shorter than a human’s, we have an incredible opportunity to find new treatments while helping both humans and animals,” said William Eward, MD, a surgical oncologist at Duke Cancer Institute.

“For rare cancers, like sarcoma, dogs provide us with remarkable insight. For every human child with osteosarcoma, there are at least 50 dogs with osteosarcoma. These dogs share our environment and have nearly identical immune systems. In studying dogs with sarcoma, we not only learn more about this type of cancer, we also gain a chance to help ‘man’s best friend.’”

 

 

 

Leave a Comment

Comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Register

Sign-up for your account with Veterinary Practice News. Your account gives you unlimited free access to our Newsletter Archives and our Digital Editions of Veterinary Practice News.
Please check the box below to confirm you would like to be added to Kenilworth Media’s various e-mail communications (includes e-newsletters, a survey now and then, and offers to the veterinarian industry*).
 

Leave this empty:

*We do not sell your e-mail address to 3rd parties, we simply forward their offers to you. Of course, you always have the right to unsubscribe from any communications you receive from us, should you change your mind in the future.