Edit Module

UC Davis Awarded $350K for Pet Cancer Treatment, Research

The Petco Foundation gave the award to help pet owners who might struggle to pay for their pet's cancer treatment.


Published:

Pixabay

The Petco Foundation awarded a $350,000 subsidy to the University of California, Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine’s William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital.

The sum will partially go to help fund cancer treatment for pets of financially disadvantaged pet owners. 

“The UC Davis vet hospital’s Oncology Service is a robust place with a high caseload and referrals from throughout California, as well as neighboring states,” said Katherine Skorupski, DVM, Dipl. ACVIM, associate professor of clinical surgery and radiological services at UC Davis, underscoring the need for the grant.

“Some clients wish to pursue cancer treatment for their pets but don't have adequate financial resources,” Dr. Skorupski said. “In these cases, the Petco Foundation Compassionate Care Fund can grant each client the ability to treat their pet’s cancer as wished.”

The funds also are slated to help pet owners who might be interested in entering their pets in UC Davis’ clinical trial program, which is exploring new paths to diagnose and treat pet cancer

The foundation’s grant would open up clinical trials to more pet owners by covering screening costs.  


Originally published in the April 2017 issue of Veterinary Practice News. Did you enjoy this article? Then subscribe today! 

Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Archive »Read More

Surgical Program for Vet Interns Helps Shelter Pets

Veterinary Speciality Center in Buffalo Grove, Ill., launched Shelter Animal Surgical Service to help shelter pets who need surgical procedures.

Study Reveals Ways to Determine Surgical Margins for Feline Tumors

Research from Oregon State University can help surgeons avoid removing noncancerous tissues in cats with feline injection-site sarcoma.

Researchers Repair Nonunion Fractions With Bone Regrowth Tech

Orthopedic surgeons at UC Davis utilized the technology to help repair bone injuries in dogs.
Edit Module
Edit Module
Edit ModuleEdit ModuleShow Tags Edit Module
Edit Module Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Events


Show More...
Edit Module
Edit Module